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NEARBY ANCIENT CITIES

KAYAKOY VILLAGE

Kayakoy is a village 8 km south of Fethiye in southwestern Turkey where Anatolian Greek speaking Christians lived until approximately 1923. The ghost town, now preserved as a museum village, consists of hundreds of rundown but still mostly intact Greek-style houses and churches which cover a small mountainside and serve as a stopping place for tourists visiting Fethiye and nearby Oludeniz.

It was built on the site of the ancient city of Carmylessus in the 18th century. It experienced a renewal after nearby Fethiye (known as Makri) was devastated by an earthquake in 1856 and a major fire in 1885. After the Greco-Turkish War, Kayakoy was largely abandoned after a population exchange agreement was signed by the Turkish and Greek governments in 1923. Many of the buildings were damaged in the 1957 Fethiye earthquake.

Its population in 1900 was about 2,000, almost all Greek Christians; however, it is now empty except for tour groups and roadside vendors selling handmade goods and items scavenged from the former village. However, there are a selection of houses which have been restored, and are currently occupied.




SAKLIKENT & TLOS

Saklikent Canyon is located in Mugla province in Turkey, 50 km from the city of Fethiye. The Canyon is 300 meters deep and 18 km long, one of the deepest in the world, resulting from the abrasion of the rocks by flowing waters over thousands of years. As the level of water rises during winter months, visitors can enter the canyon only in the summer. Four kilometers of the canyon are walkable after April, when most of the snow in the Taurus Mountains has melted and passed through on its way to the Mediterranean Sea. Saklikent means "hidden city" in Turkish.

Tlos is an ancient ruined Lycian hilltop citadel near the resort town of Kalkan in the Antalya province of southern Turkey, some 4 kilometres northwest of Saklikent Gorge. Tlos is believed to be one of the most important religious Lycian cites and settlement on the site is said to begin more than 4,000 years ago. It is one of the oldest and largest settlements of Lycia (known as 'Tlawa' in Lycian inscriptions) and was subsequently inhabited by Romans, Byzantines and eventually Ottoman Turks, making it one of few Lycian cities to be continually inhabited up until the 19th century. The influence of many cultures upon Tlos has resulted in a patchwork of structures dominated by an acropolis and fortress. On the slopes leading up to the acropolis are numerous Lycian sarcophagi and many house- and temple-type tombs cut into the face of the hill. One such is the Tomb of Bellerophon, a large temple-type tomb with an unfinished facade of four columns featuring a relief in its porch of the legendary hero Bellerophon riding his winged horse Pegasus. A carving of a lion or leopard is inside the tomb.




PATARA & LETOON

Patara (PTTARA is in Lycia) was frequently called "the chosen city" and "the metropolis of the Lycian nation Patara was the major naval and trading port of Lycia, located at the mouth of the Xanthos River, until it silted up and turned into a malaria-plagued marsh. It is not far from the sites of Letoon and Xanthos and a day trip from Kalkan, Kaş or Fethiye could easily combine the sites. Beautiful 12 km-long Patara Beach, voted one of the top beaches in the world by Times Online - Best of 2005, is an easy 10-15 minute stroll away from the major ruins at Patara. The Patara area is a national park, a key biodiversity area and is rich in birdlife.

Letoon you turn west one kilometer beyond the road from Kinik to Fethiye and continue 5 kilometers (3 miles). The site was first discovered in 1841 by a British navy officer, but the official and legal excavations have started in 1962. Today, due to the rising water level, archaeological digs have been suspended. The history of Letoon is closely linked with that of Xanthos. It is known to have been one of the most important religious centers of the Lycian region in Anatolia , Turkey. The remains unearthed indicate they belong to the period between the 7th century BC and the 6th century AD.